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Synthetic Stimulants – Bath Salts

Synthetic stimulants have made hundreds sick in the U.S.

A new drug known as bath salts has become increasingly popular and increasingly scary. These are not the common bath salts used in a bath, but a synthetic stimulant that can cause chest pains, increased  blood pressure and heart rate, agitation, hallucinations, extreme  paranoia and delusions.

bath salts

Poison centers across the U.S. have reported growing numbers of calls and more and more states are banning the drug. But as of now, there is no federal law prohibiting their sale. This drug is  being sold legally on the Internet and in drug paraphernalia stores.

White House Drug Czar Gil Kerlikowske warned people against taking the newest synthetic drugs.

The Associated Press wrote an article stating “The powdered drugs are sold under such brand names as “Ivory Wave” or  “Purple Wave.” Kerlikowske said synthetic stimulants in them have made  hundreds of users across the country sick already this year. A  Mississippi sheriff’s office has said the drugs are suspected in an  apparent overdose death there.”

Rafael Lemaitre, a spokesman for Kerlikowske’s office, said the drugs mimic the effects of cocaine, ecstasy, and LSD.

Kerlikowske’s office convened a meeting of federal drug and health  officials at the White House Tuesday to discuss their growing  popularity. He was later briefed on that discussion, Lemaitre said.

Hawaii, Michigan, Louisiana, Kentucky, and North Dakota are considering legislation to ban the products. Several counties, cities,  and local municipalities have also taken action to ban these products.

Payne said the DEA is working with health officials to study abuse  data and other information about the synthetic stimulants used in the  “bath salts.” For now, he said people should simply stay away from the  drugs.

“Just because something is not illegal does not mean it’s safe,” Payne said.

The bath salts are the latest synthetic drugs to be targeted by federal authorities, however the process to ban the drugs can take well over a year.